Dating a squire bass Strapon chatbot

Soon after their introduction, a new and larger Squier logo appeared, accompanied by the now-familiar "by Fender" logo.

In late 1983, as it had in Europe and Japan, Fender decided to import Squier instruments into the United States in order to compete with the many copies flooding the domestic market.

Entry-level Affinity Series instruments were straightforward, basic Stratocaster, Telecaster and Precision Bass guitars in black, red and white.

Next came the existing Standard Series, and at the top of the line were the new Pro Tone models, fine instruments with special touches (aged plastic parts, shell pickguards, painted headcaps, etc.) that appealed to the growing number of Squier players who preferred to upgrade their instruments with after-market parts.

To make them stand out without competing directly with Fender's existing domestic models, these U.

S.-bound Squier models were given '70s features and touted as the first instruments ever "officially authorized" to borrow from Fender's classic designs.

Squier Company in 1965; by 1982 the Squier name had resurfaced as a low-cost "value brand" alternative initially manufactured and distributed in the Japanese domestic market and soon offered to Europe, North America and the rest of the world. As his business grew, Squier moved the company to 429 Lake Ave. Up to 1900, the best violin strings were made in Europe.

Using the slogan "There's Magic in the Breed," Fender re-launched the Squier name in the U. By 1989, the series had evolved to include the Squier II Stratocaster (which had a more modern-looking tremolo) several non-pickguard contemporary designs, and even the heavy metal HM Series, which featured pointed headstocks and flashy finishes.

In one particularly galling instance, for example, one manufacturer used headstock logos closely resembling those of original pre-CBS Fender guitars, but using the words "Tokai" (with a large backward uncrossed "F"), "Springy Sound" instead of "Stratocaster," "Breezy Sound" instead of "Telecaster," "Oldies but Goldies" instead of "Original Contour Body" and —the last straw— "This is the exact replica of the good old Strat" instead of "Fender Musical Instruments" in small print below the main logo. Fender acted by setting up its own official Japanese manufacturing operation, Fender Japan, in March 1982. S.-Japanese venture, Fender Japan produced guitars with material and technical support from Fender's U. facilities; Japanese manufacturing facilities even included factories that had been producing the aforementioned Fender copies.

By May, Fender Japan had six vintage instruments— '57 and '62 Stratocaster models, a '52 Telecaster, '57 and '62 Precision Bass® models and a 62 Jazz Bass®.

These contemporary and HM series instruments soon disappeared quietly, but the Standard Series itself continued throughout the early 1990s and evolved into a new generation of Squier models.

The Squier lineup was augmented in 1996 with Affinity and Pro Tone/Vista series guitars and basses.

941

Leave a Reply