Increase in online dating

24 year old Samantha is a recently qualified graduate, working as a trainee accountant.And like a rapidly growing number of twenty-something singletons in the UK, she’s been experimenting with online dating.“It takes away that difficult initial approach and the fear that you’ll just embarrass yourself in front of a stranger.It’s also a guarantee that everyone is in the same game as you, removing a big risk factor which is what stops a lot of people.” The reason why it may feel easier to approach someone online is related to how we’ve evolved to read each other’s body language.It’s a slightly ironic shift given how much of 21 century society is driven by demand for instant gratification, but one which many are welcoming.“With online dating, you generally go first from messaging, to maybe texting and then to actually meeting up in person.” says Bernie Hogan of the Oxford Internet Institute.These days it’s the US which reaps by far the most revenue from online dating, to the tune of almost

24 year old Samantha is a recently qualified graduate, working as a trainee accountant.And like a rapidly growing number of twenty-something singletons in the UK, she’s been experimenting with online dating.“It takes away that difficult initial approach and the fear that you’ll just embarrass yourself in front of a stranger.It’s also a guarantee that everyone is in the same game as you, removing a big risk factor which is what stops a lot of people.” The reason why it may feel easier to approach someone online is related to how we’ve evolved to read each other’s body language.It’s a slightly ironic shift given how much of 21 century society is driven by demand for instant gratification, but one which many are welcoming.“With online dating, you generally go first from messaging, to maybe texting and then to actually meeting up in person.” says Bernie Hogan of the Oxford Internet Institute.These days it’s the US which reaps by far the most revenue from online dating, to the tune of almost $1 billion a year, but in many ways, the nouveau culture which is being created as a result of this popularity boom, is a hark back to a bygone era.Services like Tinder may have the reputation for encouraging hook-ups, but in reality the nature of online dating means that the intimacy is actually ramped up along a much gentler curve.

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24 year old Samantha is a recently qualified graduate, working as a trainee accountant.

And like a rapidly growing number of twenty-something singletons in the UK, she’s been experimenting with online dating.

“It takes away that difficult initial approach and the fear that you’ll just embarrass yourself in front of a stranger.

It’s also a guarantee that everyone is in the same game as you, removing a big risk factor which is what stops a lot of people.” The reason why it may feel easier to approach someone online is related to how we’ve evolved to read each other’s body language.

It’s a slightly ironic shift given how much of 21 century society is driven by demand for instant gratification, but one which many are welcoming.

“With online dating, you generally go first from messaging, to maybe texting and then to actually meeting up in person.” says Bernie Hogan of the Oxford Internet Institute.

These days it’s the US which reaps by far the most revenue from online dating, to the tune of almost $1 billion a year, but in many ways, the nouveau culture which is being created as a result of this popularity boom, is a hark back to a bygone era.

billion a year, but in many ways, the nouveau culture which is being created as a result of this popularity boom, is a hark back to a bygone era.Services like Tinder may have the reputation for encouraging hook-ups, but in reality the nature of online dating means that the intimacy is actually ramped up along a much gentler curve.

And much like social media, online dating simplifies the act of interacting with other people.

“If you think about how we normally interact, we’re really social creatures and our species has developed over time to be really sensitive to non-verbal cues like facial expression and voice gestures,” Hibberd explains.

“Online you don’t get that immediate response that you would when speaking to someone in person, which can deter people.” So what next for online dating?

“There used to be a stigma but when you get a certain critical mass of people doing it, the social norms shift which is what’s happened over the past four years,” says clinical psychologist Jessamy Hibbert.

“It’s become more normal, so these days people think, ‘Why haven’t you tried online dating? And the generation doing it now have all grown up online while when it was first out, that generation of 20-30 year olds hadn’t grown up with the internet in the same way.” With the online world becoming an ever-present part of our existence it was perhaps inevitable that we would begin shopping for love, in the same way we do for clothes, music and most other components of our everyday lives.

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