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Even though one in four Texans was uninsured in 2012, Perry claimed, "Every Texan has health care in this state.From the standpoint of having access to health care, every Texan has that.'' Then again, he's hardly the best authority when it comes to matters of health, as Perry recently compared homosexuality to alcoholism: "I may have the genetic coding that I'm inclined to be an alcoholic, but I have the desire not to do that, and I look at the homosexual issue the same way." While Perry's state is one of the least accepting of same-sex marriage, his party currently backs conversion therapy for minors, a practice that California has outlawed.The decision is likely to force a ruling from the Supreme Court, a body that's up until now been "leading from behind" on this issue.It's also a reflection of the broader inequalities that still exist for LGBT people in today's America, where activists note that marriage is only part of the picture."The ruling was a significant setback," says Advocate news director Sunnivie Brydum. When you paint the entire community as this monolith, you end up reducing it to a caricature that doesn't reflected the lived reality or the diversity of issues that face a community." So where do LGBT people have it worst?When it comes to being unfriendly to LGBT people, Texas' cities have the rest of America beat by a country mile.

Along with Mississippi, Alabama is one of eight so-called "No Promo Homo" states, with laws that "expressly forbid teachers from discussing gay and transgender issues," according to GLSEN.

(Those cities average a scary 5.6.) In Alabama, only 32 percent of citizens are in favor of marriage equality, two percentage points less than Mississippi (only Arkansas and Louisiana rank lower).

It also has a higher rate of income inequality, a particular concern for LGBT citizens who already face a greater risk for poverty.

According to Michaelangelo Signorile, the editor-at-large for the Huffington Post's Gay Voices section, the worst states are clustered in the Midwest and the Bible Belt South. "Where we see one kind of oppression, we also see another," Signorile says.

"We see in the South historic racism that's more entrenched – not that there's not racism everywhere else.

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